2020: Time to Put a President Back in the White House

Recently, I ordered a bumper magnet for my car that reads “Literally Anyone Else 2020.” It hasn’t arrived yet, but I can’t wait to reveal my 2020 choice to all of Provo. As a political science major, I should probably have a more nuanced opinion, but at this point, I will rally behind just about anyone that stands a chance against beating Trump. As society moves into a new decade and the U.S. faces enormous challenges as a nation, we need a leader in the White House.

One area where we need a model leader is foreign affairs. The past few years are rife with botched foreign policy situations. Backing out of the Iran deal, the ceaseless trade war with China, failed nuclear talks with North Korea, abandonment of the Kurds, and Trump’s numerous spats with foreign leaders have marred America on the national stage. Just last week at the NATO summit, a group of notable world leaders were caught laughing at President Trump’s behavior. Many ally leaders have difficulty respecting and trusting the unpredictable Donald Trump, complicating diplomatic efforts. While there is merit and popular support to the argument of America being spread too thin across the world, the Trump Administration’s approach to putting “America First” is hurting international friendships and increasing tensions in other parts of the world.  Our next President needs to maintain America’s foreign obligations and strengthen ties with our allies so we have leverage against threatening states like China and Russia.

Another area of concern is the example America is setting for the rest of the world. While many look to America as an exemplary nation that is willing to stand for what is right, we are completely shown up by other states when it comes to climate change. Despite strong scientific and visible evidence of climate change like stronger and more frequent natural disasters such as forest fires and hurricanes, Trump withdrew the U.S. from the Paris Climate Agreement, making it the only country of 200 signees to back down. Since the U.S. carries so much influence and power, experts say the U.S. withdrawal is “holding the world back [1].” Domestically, the Trump administration has tried to roll back emissions standards that limit the amount of carbon power plants and vehicles can spew into the air, and picked fights with states on their right to limit carbon emissions. Without significant action, climate change will only increase in severity, eventually pushing humanity past the point of no return. Now is the time to act on climate change, and our next President can begin by rejoining the Paris Agreement and reducing U.S. carbon emissions.

Finally, we need a President that is a role model. Someone who treats others with respect, and lives up to the weighty responsibility innate in the role of president. What message does it send to the world and young Americans when the leader of the free world goes on unbridled Twitter rants, calling his opponents names and hurling explicit insults? Unfortunately, this appears to be the new normal. How ironic is it that Melania Trump’s “Be Best” campaign aims to curb bullying? Trump’s antics only exacerbate partisan divides that are detrimental to a functioning democracy. 

Four years of Trump is enough–we need change. America must resume its leadership role on the world stage, and this can only happen if we elect someone capable of competent, professional leadership. 

[1] https://www.npr.org/2019/11/04/773474657/u-s-formally-begins-to-leave-the-paris-climate-agreement

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Edie Ellison

EDIE ELLISON is a senior from Carmel, California, studying Political Science. You can catch her in the JKB studying Japanese or in the HFAC practice rooms playing the violin or viola. Edie enjoys running, trying new Trader Joe’s products, and sharing her opinions on sparkling water. After graduating in April, Edie hopes to gain some work experience in the political field before pursuing a graduate degree.

Edie Ellison

EDIE ELLISON is a senior from Carmel, California, studying Political Science. You can catch her in the JKB studying Japanese or in the HFAC practice rooms playing the violin or viola. Edie enjoys running, trying new Trader Joe’s products, and sharing her opinions on sparkling water. After graduating in April, Edie hopes to gain some work experience in the political field before pursuing a graduate degree.

2 thoughts on “2020: Time to Put a President Back in the White House

  • December 11, 2019 at 3:32 am
    Permalink

    Thank you, site administrators, for allowing comments on your weird and mostly disappointing articles.

    “As a political science major, I should probably have a more nuanced opinion”

    An excellent point, perhaps your best here. But don’t expect too much of yourself. You probably would be able to see and navigate your biases, if you only had the ability to. It CAN’T be that opinionated BYU professors and peers have miseducated or radicalized you, can it? Maybe political science is just not your can of spinach. Consider another line of graduate study.

    “As society moves into a new decade…”

    Is the passage of time a supporting detail of some argument? Sounds like the “appeal to novelty” fallacy.

    “…and the U.S. faces enormous challenges as a nation,”

    Like, say, the trade imbalances, regulatory strangulation, endless deployments, and hateful social engineering from which Trump gave us some hope for relief? Thank heaven.

    “we need a leader in the White House.”

    Whoops, it looks like you hibernated through November 2016! Good news: we already got one. On track for re-election, too, in sha’ Allah.

    “Backing out of the Iran deal”

    Well, it was a pretty silly deal. Can you imagine, one sovereignty meddling in the defense policy of another? Trump’s mistakes are persisting with paranoid sanctions and the possible re-institution of the deal, not withdrawal from it. Few in Iran liked the humiliating logic of that silly agreement anyway, though it beat the previous economic terrorism. Points to Obama for having the guts to engage with ‘dictatorial’ and ‘tyrannical’ foes, though, even if his party would later condemn the approach.

    “the ceaseless trade war with China”

    As opposed to poor Obama’s clueless welcome of Chinese hegemony, followed by his helpless condemnations once they flexed their new muscle. Can you explain why you find economic surrenderism so appealing? Perhaps you like the idea of Uyghur concentration camps and other things facilitated by our naive enabling of China’s ascent? Tariffs are only the same wealth transfer to America’s poor, taken from the rich in competing economies, that leftists wish to enact domestically.

    “failed nuclear talks with North Korea”

    These fail because Trump sadly suffers from the same miserable arrogance of the left, that America’s nuclear authoritarianism is a divine right. But they succeed in that no other American president so far has dared to try head-of-state relations with North Korea, and with the hurdle of precedent gone, the imperialistic snobbery of old Democrats will be hard to slither back to. Before he’s done, may Trump seal the deal by declaring the peace that Korea has awaited for so long, despite the bipartisan shuddering of U.S.A. hawks.

    “abandonment of the Kurds”

    So, you think Kurds are the permanent wards of paternalistic U.S. colonialism? That’s very racist. All they really need is their own ultimate weapon, that you resent North Korea for, but seem fine with Iran quietly developing.

    “a group of notable world leaders were caught laughing at President Trump’s behavior”

    Shame on Trump for being late with press conferences! He deserved the ridicule! Doesn’t he know how foreign elites dodge the people? But hey, wait a second… why blame bullying on its own victim? It’s like your crass caricature of Trump is rubbing off on you. Go back and read Lehi’s vision, and think again about whether the mockery of cynics is any justification for policy. Then tune into the impeachment burlesque and ask yourself whether your reliance on foreign opinion to influence domestic elections will someday get you charged with treason.

    “While there is merit and popular support to the argument of America being spread too thin across the world, the Trump Administration’s approach[…]”

    Wow, you ALMOST gave credit where it was due. Good effort. How do you propose instead to rein in American impositions — with scandalous back-room deals, “more flexibility after the election”, while lying to the public? That may be how it’s done in a republic, but not in a democracy. (You might want to switch parties!)

    “needs to maintain America’s foreign obligations and strengthen ties with our allies”

    Hooray, foreign entanglements! That’s not dangerous at all! Somewhere, the enraged ghost of George Washington is getting ready to possess a small girl, and cause her to shriek out, “The nation which indulges toward another an habitual hatred or an habitual fondness is in some degree a slave. It is a slave to its animosity or to its affection, either of which is sufficient to lead it astray from its duty and its interest.”

    “so we have leverage against threatening states like China and Russia”

    Huh? You just criticized Trump for using the Union’s internal economic leverage against China. So you want other countries to do your own dirty work? Quick, enroll in an ethics class before graduating!

    [Your climate change paragraph.]

    Take it easy, Greta. Trump hasn’t stolen your dreams and your childhood. As multi-millionaire climate expert Al Gore (and many others) promised, we’ve already gone WAY past the point of no return; this happened before Trump came along to save us from radical leftism. Plus, it was never going to be the last chance of “humanity”; 97% of scientists reassure us that this will only be a slightly warmer planet (maybe 2-7 degrees F; badly needed, since cold is thought to kill more people than heat), with some ecosystemic and economic fluctuation, nowhere near an extinction-level event.

    “Finally, we need a President that is a role model.”

    Now you’re mixing church with state. What we need is somebody who fulfills the defined duties of a president, not somebody who exemplifies only a certain, narrow range of popular, smarmy, slimy personality types. We certainly don’t need to discriminate against and persecute those who speak bluntly or know how to use Twitter to report to their democratic bosses.

    “What message does it send […] unbridled Twitter rants, calling his opponents names and hurling explicit insults?”

    Please don’t be shocked by this, but the on-line presidency is here to stay, because people love it. Now, if you think politics is a friendly, low-stakes game of checkers at the park with your best friend… you’ll soon learn differently. Everybody knows the great majority of Trump insults are reflexively made at those who have already abused him. He has the right and the duty not to let people bullies stomp on him, and many millions of downtrodden Americans, and foreigners elsewhere, greatly admire his sense of self-respect. And would you like to know why Trump was elected at all? Because of eight years of divisive belittlement and radicalism from the last guy. And what exactly do you do with the fact that you and your crew at Political Review, almost without exception, continually demean Trump and, by extension, his supporters? Is your ugliness, too, Trump’s doing?

    Sorry, our choices belong to us; we are not puppets of our president. Take some responsibility. Your publication also exacerbates. Your BYU department also divides. Your party also inflames. And all you can wish for is to win the next election to do it all again worse, in reverse. That’s fine, you have the opportunity next year, but keep in mind that this accelerating pendulum may not end well. What you should be advocating, with many willing folks across the aisle, is a real solution for everybody: exploring new norms of autonomy, nullification, and secession. Trump, with his old-fashioned patriotism, may not have caught this vision, but communities’ and states’ agreeing to leave each other the heck alone could be the last chance Americans have for agreement.

    Reply
    • December 11, 2019 at 10:19 pm
      Permalink

      Steve,

      As Editor-in-chief and site adminstrator, I thank you for taking the time to read a web-exclusive article, along with your engagement via comment. I do, however, take issue with the rhetoric and content written above, as I find your comment to be especially crude and your arguments half-baked. You are consistently disrespectful and demeaning throughout, and it appears that you are trying to come to grips with your own position rather than given any honest answers to the points of Edie’s article. While it’s extremely disappointing to see this type of dialogue happen, especially from a reader,it’s not too surprising–given that this is the internet. It’s much too easy to spout off in a faceless comment section.

      That being said, we always welcome comments and different opinions, we simply ask that dialogue remain respectable and decent. In fact, if you are a student, you are free to submit your own article for potential publication via our email. I also invite you to read our other articles uploaded this month. In the end, all I can do is simply encourage you to rise above the demeaning nature of politics today, so we may have more productive dialogue moving forward. Thanks again for reading.

      Reply

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