Letter from the Editor: December 2017

2017 was quite the year.

Here are just a few highlights: the U.S. has a new president, two of the top 15 largest terror attacks ever have happened in the past two months (in Mogadishu, Somalia and Bir al-Abed, Egypt), the Women’s March became the largest protest in American history, coalition forces have pushed ISIS out of many of its former stronghold cities in Syria and Iraq, we experienced one of the worst hurricane seasons in recent history, and Russia is banned from the Olympics.

The end of the semester and the end of the calendar year both inevitably inspire some introspection & a fond / nostalgic / terrified backward look at the events of the months previous. As we thought about a good way to frame our last issue of the year, we realized; what sums up a year better than a yearbook? It may be a little juvenile of an idea (do colleges have yearbooks?) but it gets the job done.

The quintessential yearbook contains a “superlatives” section, in which the student body votes for members of the student body that they think deserve titles–whether positive or negative–for their personalities, relationships, or actions. As the staff of the BYU Political Review, the world is our campus. Since we do our best to analyze politics on the local, national, and world levels, we’ve picked some national and world figures we believe deserve superlatives for their actions through the years.

As with a normal yearbook, some of our superlatives are positive, like cutest couple or perfect attendance. Others are distinctly less happily backlit. In any case, we’ve tried to give you a factual background and real opinions about what makes these world and national leaders great, or not so great.

We’d love to hear what you think about our assessments of our 2017 superlatives! Feel free to email your thoughts to byupoliticalreview@gmail.com, follow us on Twitter @byupolitics, like us on Facebook @BYUPR, and view our articles on the web at politicalreview.byu.edu.

Hoping for an uneventful last couple of weeks of 2017,

Sage Smiley

Editor-in-chief

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Sage Smiley

Writer at BYU Political Review
Sage Smiley is an earthy gal from Portland, Oregon. Sage is a double major in journalism and Arabic and is also pursuing pre-med because she is excessive. She feels passionately about refugees, feminism, and the fact that orcas are still kept in tiny tanks. Sage enjoys long walks through Savers, tea, odd socks, sushi, and witty banter.

Sage Smiley

Sage Smiley is an earthy gal from Portland, Oregon. Sage is a double major in journalism and Arabic and is also pursuing pre-med because she is excessive. She feels passionately about refugees, feminism, and the fact that orcas are still kept in tiny tanks. Sage enjoys long walks through Savers, tea, odd socks, sushi, and witty banter.

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